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College of Pharmacy 



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CURRICULUM GUIDE & APPLICATION INFORMATION 



Pre-pharmacy curriculum 



For specific course descriptions and prerequisites, see the University of 
Georgia Undergraduate Bulletin or visit the VGA Website at 
http:/ www.bulletin.uga.edu. 



AREA A -Essential Skills (9 hours) 



ENGL 1101 
ENGL 1102 
MATH 1113 



English Composition I 
English Composition II 
Precalculus 



AREA B- Institutional Options (1 hour) 

The College of Pharmacy has no prescribed 
courses in this area. Requirements can be met by 
fulfilling requirements in Areas A, C, D, and E. 

AREA C - Humanities/Fine Arts (6 hours) 

SPCM 1100 Communication in 

Human Society or 
SPCM 1500 Introduction to Interpersonal 

Communication 3 

Humanities Elective 3 

In addition to SPCM 1100 or 1500, students may 
select either a humanities or fine arts course 
from a list of courses that can be found in the 
University of Georgia Bulletin or on the UGA 
website at www.uga.edu . 



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Application to the professional progm 



To be admitted to the professional program in the 
College of Pharmacy, a student must complete 
pre-pharmacy requirements. At the University of 
Georgia, the pre-pharmacy program is administered 
through the College of Arts and Sciences. The two 
years of pre-pharmacy education require satisfactory 
completion of not less than 60 semester hours of 
academic work counting toward the pharmacy 
degree. In addition, students must meet the general 
requirements for physical education. 

Applicants to the professional program must take the Pharmacy College 
Admission Test (PC AT). The fall offering date is the preferred time. In addition 
to the applicant's grade point average, the selection process will utilize the 



AREA D- Science, Mathematics, and Technology (12 hours) 



CHEM 1211 
CHEM1211L 
CHEM 1212 
CHEM 1212L 
MATH 2200-2200L 



Freshman Chemistry I 
Freshman Chemistry I Lab 
Freshman Chemistry II 
Freshman Chemistry II Lab 
Analytic Geometry and Calculus 



AREA E - Social Sciences (1 2 hours) 

ECON 2105 Principles of Macroeconomics or 

ECON 2106 Principles of Microeconomics 

POLS 1101 

If student hasn't met Georgia and U.S. Constitution requirement 

HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 

If student hasn't met Georgia and U.S. History requirement 
Social Studies Elective 

For other Social Science electives, see UGA Bulletin or 

UGA website, www.uga.edu. 

AREA F - Courses Related to Major (20 hours) 



CHEM 2211 
CHEM 2211 L 
CHEM 2212 
CHEM 2212L 
BIOL 1107-1107L 
BIOL 1108-1108L 
STAT 2000 



Modern Organic Chemistry I 
Modern Organic Chemistry Lab I 
Modern Organic Chemistry II 
Modern Organic Chemistry Lab II 
Principles of Biology I 
Principles of Biology II 
Elementary Statistics 



PCAT scores, recommendations and an on-campus interview. The College of 
Pharmacy accepts students into its professional program for beginning classes 
only in the Fall semester. 

Application to the College of Pharmacy must be submitted by February 1. 
Transcripts showing all college work taken should accompany the application. 
Students may apply to the College of Pharmacy when they have completed three 
semesters of academic work. Applicants who are accepted but do not attend 
for the accepted term must repeat the admission process for a future date. 

Applicants for admission to the College of Pharmacy who are known to have 
been officially dismissed from another pharmacy program will not be accepted. 
A student who gains entrance to the College by misrepresentation of facts may 
be dismissed immediately. 



Doctor of Pharmacy curriculum 



FIRST PROFESSIONAL YEAR 

The first year curriculum introduces the student to "systems" on which the 
profession is based, e.g., organ systems, drug delivery systems, health care 
systems, computer systems, communications, and medical terminology. This 
provides the foundation on which the second, third, and fourth professional 
years are built. 

Fall Semester 

PHRM 3010 
PHRM 3100 
PHRM 3400 
PHRM 3470 
PHRM 3050 
PHRM 3800 
PHRM 3940 
PHRM 3900 



Introduction to Pharmacy 
Pharmacy Skills Lab I 
Anatomy and Physiology I 
Pathophysiology I 
Biochemical Basis of Disease I 
Clinical Applications I 
Survey of Drug Information 
Pharmacy Intercommunications 




Spring Semester 

PHRM 3200 Quantitative Methods in Pharmacy 2 

PHRM 3110 Pharmacy Skills Lab II 2 

PHRM 3410 Anatomy and Physiology II 3 

PHRM 3480 Pathophysiology II 3 

PHRM 3060 Biochemical Basis of Disease II 2 

PHRM 3750 Pharmacy and US Health Care System 3 
PHRM 3850 Clinical Applications II 1 

PHRM 4800 Pharmacy Seminar _1 

17 



SECOND PROFESSIONAL YEAR 

In the second year, the curriculum focuses on drugs - their structure, function, 
mechanism of action, formulation, and clinical use in patients. 




Fall Semester 
PHRM 4050 
PHRM 4120 
PHRM 4180 
PHRM 4200 
PHRM 4410 
PHRM 4850 
PHRM 4900 
Elective 



Principles of Medicinal Chemistry I 

Pharmacy Skills Lab III 

Drug Therapy of Infectious Disease 

Principles of Pharmaceutics I 

Pharmacology I 

Disease Management I 

Clinical Applications III 



Spring Semester 

PHRM 4060 Principles of Medicinal Chemistry II 
PHRM 4130 Pharmacy Skills Lab IV 
PHRM 4190 Chemotherapy of Cancer 
PHRM 4210 Principles of Pharmaceutics II 



2 
2 
3 
2 
3 
3 
1 
_2 
18 



PHRM 4420 Pharmacology II 

PHRM 4860 Disease Management II 

PHRM 4950 Clinical Applications IV 

PHRM 4700 Pharmacy Statistics and Drug Information 

THIRD PROFESSIONAL YEAR 

Third year courses utilize disease and drug information presented in the 
first and second years to make decisions for individual patients. The 
student will construct pharmacotherapy regimens and write plans to 
monitor drug therapy for efficacy and safety. 

Fall Semester 



3 

3 

1 

_2 

17 



PHRM 5140 
PHRM 5260 
PHRM 5820 
PHRM 5860 
PHRM 5920 
Electives 



Pharmacy Skills Lab V 
Clinical Pharmacokinetics I 
Self-Care & Nonprescription Drugs 
Pharmacotherapy I 
Clinical Seminar 



Spring Semester 

PHRM 5150 Pharmacy Skills Lab VI 

PHRM 5650 Pharmacy Care Management 

PHRM 5870 Pharmacotherapy II 

PHRM 5920 Clinical Seminar' 

PHRM 5680 Pharmacy Law & Ethics 

PHRM 5950 Advanced Drug Information 

and Drug Policy Management 
Electives 



_5 

18 



2 
4 
3 
4 
1 
_5 
19 




FOURTH PROFESSIONAL YEAR 

Full time clerkship rotations in institutional, community and other patient 
care settings. 

Summer Semester 



PHRM 5901 
PHRM 5902 

Fall Semester 

PHRM 5903 
PHRM 5904 
PHRM 5905 



Required Pharmacy Clerkship 
Required Pharmacy Clerkship 



Required Pharmacy Clerkship 
Required Pharmacy Clerkship 
Required Pharmacy Clerkship 



Spring Semester 

PHRM 5906 Required Pharmacy Clerkship 
PHRM 5907 Required Pharmacy Clerkship 
PHRM 5908 Required Pharmacy Clerkship 



5 
_5 

10 

5 

5 

_5 

15 

5 

5 

_5 

15 



PROGRAM OF STUDY 

The College of Pharmacy offers the Doctor of Pharmacy degree to 
students who successfully complete the six-year study of prescribed 
courses. The first two years (pre-pharmacy) may be completed at 
any accredited institution of higher education. The last four years 
(nine semesters) are in the professional program and must be in 
residence at the College of Pharmacy. At least four years of study in 
the professional program are required by the American Council on 
Pharmaceutical Education. 

HOURS 

In order to receive the Doctor of Pharmacy degree from the College 
of Pharmacy, a student must have earned academic credit for not 
less than 60 semester hours (exclusive of physical education) in 
pre-pharmacy course work and 146 semester hours of required 
professional course work. 

FINANCIAL AID 

Requests for scholarships and loans are handled through The 
University of Georgia Financial Aid Office. The office is open year- 
round (with the exception of holidays), and the hours of operation 
are 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM Monday through Friday. For more information 
about financial aid and eligibility, you may call the Student Financial 
Aid Office at (706)542-3476 or visit the UGA Website at www.uga. 
edu/osfa/ . 

THE HOPE SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM 

Students who meet the criteria for the HOPE Scholarship and have 
not exceeded the maximum number of credit hours under the HOPE 
program may continue their HOPE Scholarship in the pharmacy 
curriculum. Pharmacy students have an eligibility limit of 127 
semester hours (which includes both pre-pharmacy and pharmacy 
course work) under the HOPE guidelines. Specific questions 
regarding eligibility for the HOPE Scholarship should be directed to 
The University of Georgia Student Financial Aid Office. 

INFORMATION AND APPLICATION 

Online at www.rx.uga.edu or Ken Duke, Assistant to the Dean, at 

706-542-5278. 








warn 



PHARMACY INTERNSHIP 

In order to become licensed to practice pharmacy in the state of 
Georgia, 1500 hours of internship must be earned as a pharmacy 
intern under the immediate supervision of a pharmacist. Credit for 
internship may be received only after a student has been licensed by 
the Georgia State Board of Pharmacy as a pharmacy intern. Application 
for a pharmacy intern license can only be made once a student has 
enrolled in a college of pharmacy. Students are encouraged to satisfy 
internship requirements during the summers. A total of 1000 hours of 
internship credit will be awarded for work performed while registered 
for academic credit in the Doctor of Pharmacy clerkships. An intern 
license is required for participation in all patient care experiences. 

All pharmacy interns must contact the Joint Secretary, State Examining 
Boards, 237 Coliseum Drive, Macon, Georgia 31217-3858 (Phone: 
(478) 207-1686; Fax: (478) 207-1699) in order to receive a license. 
Applications can be obtained from the Board of Pharmacy web site 
at www.sos.ga.us/ plb/pharmacy . The pharmacist supervising the 
intern must also notify the joint secretary that the intern is under 
his/her supervision. 

PRACTICE EXPERIENCE 

The practice experience program is designed to develop professional 
practice skills in a variety of patient care settings. The practice 
experience program is divided into two components: early and 
advanced pharmacy practice experiences. 

Possible advanced practice experiences in the fourth year include: 

Ambulatorv Care 



Automation 

Cardiology 

Community Pharmacy Practice 

Compounding 

Consultant Pharmacy 

Critical Care/ Operating Room 

Drug Information/ Medication 

Utilization Evaluation 
Emergency Medicine 
Family Medicine 
Gastroenterology 
Geriatrics 
Home Health 
Hospital Pharmacy Practice 



Industry 

Infectious Disease 

Internal Medicine 

Managed Care 

Neurology 

Nuclear Pharmacy/ Radiology 

Nutrition Support 

OB/Women's Health 

Oncology 

Pediatrics/ Neonatology 

Pharmacokinetics 

Pharmacy Administration 

Psychiatry 

Public Health 

Research 



APPLICATION GUIDELINES 

1. Applicants must submit a completed application on-line before 
February 1. The earlier the application is submitted, the sooner it will be 
processed and considered by the Admissions Committee. The on-line 
application is available from the College's Website ( www.rx.uga.edu ). 

2. At least two recommendations are required for each applicant. The 
reference form can be downloaded from the College's Website 
( www.rx.uga.edu ). One recommender should be a pre-pharmacy 
advisor or someone familiar with the applicant's educational 
background; the other should be a health care professional, preferably 
a pharmacist. Applicants may submit additional recommendations 
by photocopying a blank reference form or printing additional copies 
from the Web page. 

3. All applicants must take the Pharmacy College Admission Test 
(PC AT) and have their scores sent to The University of Georgia College 
of Pharmacy. The Fall test date is preferred so that students have the 
opportunity to re-take the test in January (in time to meet the February 
1 application deadline) if they desire. Students may take the PCAT as 
many times as they wish without penalty. Individual percentile scores 
as well as Composite percentile scores are reviewed by the Admissions 
Committee. Review books and courses for the PCAT are available. 
For more information, contact the College of Pharmacy Admissions 
Office. 

4. All applicants should be prepared for an on-campus interview 
with members of the Admissions Committee and currently enrolled 
pharmacy students. During the interview, students may be asked to 
discuss their academic background, reasons for selecting pharmacy 
as a profession, plans upon graduation, work experience, leadership 
experience, and extracurricular/ entrepreneurial experiences. Verbal 
and written communication skills will also be evaluated by the 
committee. 



IMPORTANT DATES — APPLY EARLY! 

Summer or Early Fall — Complete on-line application for the College 

of Pharmacy and the PCAT 

October — Fall PCAT Exam (see PCAT application for dates, time and 

locations) 

Fall Term — Submit application and preliminary transcripts before 
the end of the Fall Term. Completed files will be considered for early 
interview dates. 

January — Winter PCAT (see PCAT application for dates, time and 
locations) 

February 1 — File completion date. Transcripts of all work completed 
through the Fall Term, recommendations, and materials for which 
the student is responsible (i.e., everything except official PCAT score 
reports)